Humanistic Antidotes to Social Media/Cell Phone Addiction in the College Classroom

Elliot Benjamin

Abstract


This article describes “humanistic antidotes” to offset the widespread social media/cell phone addiction prevalent in current US college classrooms. The inappropriate use of cell phones to engage in social media in college classrooms is a pervasive problem that many college instructors have complained about.  The dominant focus of this article is in humanistic education, in which the author's efforts at getting psychology college students to put away their cell phones, “talk with each other,” and gain awareness of the detrimental effects of social media addiction and narcissism is illustrated.  The methodology utilized in this article is based upon autoethnographic research, where relevant experiences of the researcher are considered to be an informative and fundamental part of the research. The author describes in narrative form his relevant experiences in formulating humanistic antidotes to the excessive and inappropriate use of cell phones to engage in social media, that he encountered in his college psychology teaching. These humanistic antidotes are described as a three-step process: 1) take necessary actions to eliminate as much as possible the inappropriate use of cell phones in the classroom; 2) engage students in required personal/academic small group discussions every class period; 3) include small discussions about the excessive and inappropriate use of cell phones and social media, and require them to write and present project papers of their own choosing, which will likely include some papers on the topic of cell phone/social media addiction, demonstrating their awareness of the detrimental aspects of this pervasive problem.


Keywords


Autoethnography, Humanistic education, Humanistic psychology, Naricissism, Social media addiction

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References


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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.18533/journal.v5i8.978

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