Teaching and the Human Brain

Authors

  • Joseph William Gilkey Jr St John's University

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.18533/journal.v3i2.377

Keywords:

On-line Teaching, Brain, Distance Education

Abstract

The assessment process built into student evaluations for such courses should take into account the various learning engagement points that enhanced the learning experience.    

Author Biography

Joseph William Gilkey Jr, St John's University

Adjunct Asst. Professor 

References

Bangert, A. W. (2004, 3rd Quarter). The seven principles of good practice: A framework for evaluating on-line teaching. THe Internet and Higher Education, 217-232.

Daradoumis, T. M. (2001). Enabling novel methodologies to promote virtual collaborative study and learning in distance education. 20th World Conference on Open Learning and Distance Education. Dusseldoff.

M. Bieber, R. G.-S. (2002). Towards knowledge-sharing and learning in vitual professional communities. 35th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, 1-10. IEEE Computer Society.

Mogus, I. D. (2012, September 13). The impact of student activity in a virtual learning environment on their final mark. Retrieved from Active Learning in Higher Education: http://alh.sagepub.com/

Salmon, G. (2003). E-Moderating: The key to teaching & learning online. London: Taylor & Francis, Ltd.

Shin, N. (2002). Beyond interaction: the relational construct of ‘transactional presence’. Open Learning, 121-136.

Shin, N. (2003). Transcational presence as a critical predictor of success in distance learning. Distance Education, 1.

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Published

2014-03-04

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Article