Socio-Cultural Implications of Exclusive Bio-Paternity System on The Health of Women of Owukpa Community In Benue State, Nigeria

takim asu ojua, CHIEMEZIE ATAMA, JEOMA IGWE, D. S. OBEKEZIE, CHIDI UGWU

Abstract


There is generally poor maternal health and high maternal mortality rate in developing countries, thus influencing the examination of the practice of bio-paternity pattern as one of the often over-looked   socio-cultural factors contributing to poor health of women in Nigerian rural communities.  The study was based on a survey conducted at Owukpa community in Ogbadigbo LGA of Benue State.  The study made use of 268 respondents for the study. The questionnaires constituted the major instrument for the data collection and the in-depth interviews were also used.  The result showed that bio paternity is the prevalent cultural or traditional pattern of paternity in the community, and it has certain grievous implications for maternal health. Thus, it was found that this pattern of paternity facilitates multiple partnerships, which is the major cause of the spread of different sexually transmitted diseases like HIV/AIDS in the community. Bio-paternity pattern   was also found to have effects on the fertility rate in the community. The paper highlighted some of the effects of this bio-paternity and recommends that more advocacy services be outlined for children, women and entire community about the effects of some of these negative practices. More health and educational policies be established to engage and enlighten the women specifically about the dangers of this bio-paternity.


Keywords


Bio Paternity; Socio-cultural;Implications; Exclusive Health; Women.

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References


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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.18533/journal.v3i7.492

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